Survival Bracelets

28 Jul

Next year my other half is taking the year off work, to do all those things that it’s far too easy to make excuses not to do. He has been saving and planning for a while now and to give his year a bit of structure (& purpose) he has set himself several challenges, you can read all about them on his website didiever & even join in with a challenge or two. Being the more adventurous type (well far more than I am) one of his challenges is a wilderness trek. In preparation he’s been ruthlessly checking over old hiking gear, reading up on appropriate equipment and inevitably buying new stuff.

Inspiration Aspiration Opportunity © Martin M 2013 didiever.co.uk

Inspiration Aspiration Opportunity © Martin M 2013 didiever.co.uk

I’m still amazed at how much equipment he’ll need and how the weight of every single item is so important as it all adds up (I’m a dutiful girlfriend, I listen, I nod and make the appropriate oohs & aahhs – but a lot goes over my head).

It's relatively cost effective, 3 packs of cord & a few clasps for under £10 and I have plenty of left over cord after making 3 bracelets.

It’s relatively cost effective, 3 packs of cord & a few clasps for under £10 and I have plenty of left over cord after making 3 bracelets.

However I did find myself something useful to contribute. You might already have seen the trend for paracord bracelets on pinterest & alike. Working in a Bead shop I have had the chance to play with it and make several lovely knotted designs. Paracord bracelets were originally made as survival bracelets, made of strong parachute cord (hence the name) and woven into simple designs to be worn by hikers, climbers and trekkers as an easy way to carry around a potentially lifesaving length of cord. Check out this webpage & also this one I found (some interesting uses & opinions on paracord – some ideas seem a little farfetched, but having seen 127 hours – who knows what might happen).

I've used both 325 & 550 paracord: the 550 for the practical side of things & 325 (also practical) but also prevent the bracelets become too chunky to wear.

I’ve used both 325 & 550 paracord: the 550 for the practical side of things & 325 (also practical) but also prevent the bracelets become too chunky to wear.

I thought I’d make one for Martin to take trekking, however my choice of knot had to be carefully considered so that should the paracord be needed it would be easy to unravel, so I needed some form of quick release unravel-able knot. I searched on pinterest and ended up with lots of lovely looking knots – none of them easy to undo. I refined my search and I eventually discovered the double chain Sinnet knot which does unravel. I must admit I found the technique simple, however using two colours of cord, definitely made it trickier and it was a bit of a struggle getting each cord to sit in the right place – however I did it. It was definitely worth the frustration it took to get the pattern going & once I was in the swing of things it came together quickly.

Black 500 paracord & blue 325 paracord

Black 500 paracord & blue 325 paracord

Black 500 paracord & neon pink 325 paracord

Black 500 paracord & neon pink 325 paracord

Martin will get the opportunity to try some of his new gear out while on holiday with friends this week. They’re all staying in one of his friend’s family cottage in Scotland, an annual tradition and part of this tradition for Martin is getting his friend a gift to thank her, usually a last minute affair, but this year I suggested I made a similar bracelet to give to her, since she too does plenty of walking and is also a keen skier, it would be ideal.

When it come to finishing in the ends menting them with a lighter, then immediately squashing them against a flat surface smooths the ends out nicely.

When it come to finishing in the ends melting them with a lighter, then immediately squashing them against a flat surface, works well and smooths the ends out nicely.

With the left over cord I made a second bracelet using fishtail knotting, not as functional (this knot doesn’t unravel) but it is lovely (one of my favourite knots).

Fishtail Paracord bracelet

Fishtail Paracord bracelet

Right back to my crafting ready for the The Lunesdale Show, my entries are coming together nicely, watch out for more posts soon.

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One Response to “Survival Bracelets”

  1. jr January 28, 2015 at 2:11 pm #

    hi great craft to do with guides thanks

    Like

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